Newsletter

Adolescent Cognition and Emotion (ACE) Lab​

Amy Mezulis, PhD
Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology
Principal Investigator

The Adolescent Cognition and Emotion Lab (ACE Lab) is committed to understanding the dramatic rise in mood disorders and mood-related problems in adolescence. We are particularly interested in pathways to depression and self-injury. Our team specializes in understanding how youth respond emotionally, physiologically, and cognitively to both positive and stressful life events. 

SNAP4Kids-2 is a research study supported by a National Institute of Mental Health grant (2R15098294-02) to Dr. Mezulis.

Lab staff

Publications

Current studies

SNAP4Kids-2 examines these processes in young adolescents (10- to 14-year-olds). Involvement in the study includes a series of questionnaires and three visits to our lab at Seattle Pacific University.

SASSY: Stress and Somatic Symptoms in Young Adults

The SASSY study examines the relationships between physiological markers — positive and negative events — and cognitive responses as they predict depressive and somatic symptoms among college students. Participants attend a laboratory visit that allows for collection of physiological data in addition to responding to a series of questionnaires. To learn more, contact Dr. Amy Mezulis at mezulis@spu.edu.

The Post-traumatic Stress and Growth Study

This study examines the psychological wellbeing of SPU students, faculty, and staff following the June 5, 2014, shooting on the SPU campus.

ACE Lab
Seattle Pacific University
3307 Third Ave. W, Suite 107
Seattle, WA 98119

Phone: 206-281-2820
Fax: 206-281-2695
Email:
acelab@spu.edu

Snap 4 Kids Logo

SNAP4Kids-2

We are currently recruiting Seattle-area middle schoolers ages 10–14 to participate in a study examining how youth respond to positive and stressful life events.

Amy Mezulis

Why I Teach at SPU

Amy Mezulis, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology

“I teach at SPU because of its balanced perspective on training both scientists and practitioners of clinical psychology. Mentorship is also a key component of our PhD program, and I strongly value the opportunity to participate in a meaningful way in the professional development of our students.”

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