Intimate Partner Violence

When you see the red flags of relationship violence,

STEP UP!  SAY SOMETHING!

Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) describes physical violence, sexual violence, stalking and psychological aggression (including coercive acts) by a current or former intimate partner.1 Intimate Partner Violence affects people of all ages, sexes, cultures, religions, professions and income levels, yet remains widely under-reported.

Several different words are used to describe Intimate Partner Violence. They include:

  • Relationship abuse
  • Intimate partner violence
  • Relationship violence
  • Dating abuse
  • Domestic abuse
  • Domestic violence

Examples of intimate partners include current or former spouses, boyfriends or girlfriends, dating partners, or sexual partners. IPV can occur between heterosexual or same-sex couples and does not require sexual intimacy. 

1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/ViolencePrevention/intimatepartnerviolence/definitions.html 

Red Flags of Abuse

There are many warning signs that can help identify whether you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship. The following list includes warning signs that someone may be abusive. Red flags include someone who:

  • Wants to move too quickly into the relationship.
  • Early in the relationship flatters you constantly, and seems "too good to be true."
  • Wants you all to him- or herself; insists that you stop spending time with your friends or family.
  • Insists that you stop participating in hobbies or activities, quit school, or quit your job.
  • Does not honor your boundaries. 
  • Is excessively jealous and accuses you of being unfaithful. 
  • Wants to know where you are all of the time and frequently calls, emails, and texts you throughout the day. 
  • Criticizes or puts you down; says you are crazy, stupid, and/or fat/unattractive, or that no one else would ever want or love you. 
  • Takes no responsibility for his or her behavior and blames others. 
  • Has a history of abusing others. 
  • Blames the entire failure of previous relationships on his or her former partner; for example, "My ex was totally crazy." 
  • Takes your money or runs up your credit card debt. 
  • Rages out of control with you but can maintain composure around others. 

For help and information

More Local Resources in Washington State can be found at the http://wscadv.org/washington-domestic-violence-programs/

What About The Men?

Listen to the conversation about men’s issues within domestic violence with Dr. Nancy Murphy and Andrew J. Bauman

Teen Dating Violence: What Do We Know About Dating Violence from Adolescence into Young Adulthood?

Teen dating violence is a serious public health problem that is also associated with increased odds of experiencing adult intimate partner violence. This webinar will provide newly emerging information from two NIH/NIJ co-funded longitudinal studies about the progression of dating violence in the period between adolescence and early adulthood. 

Seattle Pacific University gratefully acknowledges the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, National Institute of Justice, for allowing us to reproduce, in part or in whole, the video Teen Dating Violence - What Do We Know About Dating Violence from Adolescence into Young Adulthood? The opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this video are those of the speaker(s) and do not necessarily represent the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

close(X)