Creative Conversations

Creative Conversations

Come to the Seattle Pacific University Library to hear members of the SPU community share scholarly and creative works in progress. Bring your curiosity and join in conversations about the discovery, creation, and sharing of knowledge.

Where: Library Reading Room, Main Floor (Wheelchair Accessible)
Cost: Free

Michael Paulus, Library; Bruce Baker, Business; Mike Langford, Theology

Thursday, February 4th
3–3:50 p.m.

Digital Wisdom: Continuing the Conversation

Last November, SPU invited three theologians to visit campus to speak about theology, technology, and culture. Their talks, which covered topics such as identity and social media, relationships and technoculture, and attention and the internet, provide a rich resource for thinking about how we can use technology wisely to become wiser people. Professors Bruce Baker (Business), Mike Langford (Theology), and Michael Paulus (Library) will review their interactions with these theologians and discuss their own constructive work to develop a framework for digital wisdom, which includes theological principles, cultural critiques, and formative practices.

Al Erisman, Business

Thursday, February 11th
12–12:50 p.m.

Business, Theology, and Mathematics 

The story of Joseph in Genesis provides a great picture of preparation for a career in business.  Mathematics provides a lens for thinking about relationships, business, theology, and politics.  Al Erisman will share a story of connections across disciplines in the work he has been doing over the past several years.

Amy Robertson and Rachel Scherr, Physics

Thursday, February 18th
12–12:50 p.m.

Responsive Teaching in Science and Mathematics

Responsive teaching, at heart, celebrates the “having of wonderful ideas." It stems from several foundational assumptions: that students come to classrooms with a wealth of productive knowledge and experience; that this wealth is too rich and diverse for teachers and curricula to know it in advance; and that students should learn to be the agents of their own learning. From these assumptions comes the stance that teaching begins with watching and listening. Responsive instruction foregrounds the substance of students’ ideas, seeks out disciplinary connections within students’ ideas, and adapts or builds instruction on the basis of students’ ideas. In this Creative Conversation, Robertson and Scherr will share examples of  Responsive teaching, at heart, celebrates the “having of wonderful ideas." It stems from several foundational assumptions: that students come to classrooms with a wealth of productive knowledge and experience; that this wealth is too rich and diverse for teachers and curricula to know it in advance; and that students should learn to be the agents of their own learning. From these assumptions comes the stance that teaching begins with watching and listening. Responsive instruction foregrounds the substance of students’ ideas, seeks out disciplinary connections within students’ ideas, and adapts or builds instruction on the basis of students’ ideas. In this Creative Conversation, Robertson and Scherr will share examples of responsive teaching from their recent edited book, Responsive Teaching in Science and Mathematics, and will unpack some of the book’s themes in the context of these examples.

Kerry Dearborn, Theology

Thursday, February 25th
3–3:50 p.m.

Drinking from the Wells of New Creation: The Holy Spirit and Imagination in Reconciliation

Reconciliation is a miracle. It is the creative work of God. And it requires the creation of imaginations that can forgive & love even the enemy. In this session we will probe the ways in which the Holy Spirit transforms imaginations to foster reconciliation between individuals & communities.



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