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HEALTH AND SAFETY

Seattle Pacific University seeks to maintain a safe and healthy environment for the campus community. However, because no security system can eliminate all risk, it is hoped that each member of the University community will contribute to campus safety. To assist in this, Seattle Pacific has established certain policies and procedures which are administered by the Office of Safety and Security (ext. 2922) and the Office of Student Life (ext. 2247).

This page offers information on University policy related to issues of health and safety, as well as tips on how to protect yourself and your property from crime. Copies of the Health & Safety report are available in the Office of Safety and Security.  

DOWNLOAD OTHER HEALTH AND SAFETY REPORTS

Written Hazard Communication Program (Word Doc)
Accident Prevention Program (Word Doc)
Hazardous Materials and MSDS Notebooks

2011 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report (PDF)

2012 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report (PDF)

2012 Emergency Drill Log (PDF)

2012 Fire Log (PDF)

2012 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report

This report includes statistics for the previous three years concerning reported crimes that occurred on-campus, in certain off-campus buildings or property owned or controlled by Seattle Pacific University; and on public property within, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from, the campus. The report also includes institutional policies concerning campus security, and personal safety including topics such as; crime prevention, campus security law enforcement authority, crime reporting policies, disciplinary procedures, and other matters related to security on campus.

 

Welcome

Seattle Pacific University is committed to creating and maintaining a safe working and living environment for the students, faculty and staff of the University. However, because no security system can eliminate all risk, it is expected that each member of the SPU community contribute to campus safety.

This report, in compliance with the Clery Act, contains information regarding crime prevention programs offered at the University, tips on crime prevention and personal safety, instruction on reporting crimes and emergencies, SPU crime statistics and security-related policies and statements. The policies and procedures outlined in this report were developed in the interest of students’ safety. Students can contribute to their safety by following these guidelines and being aware of how they can protect themselves.

 

Your Right to Know

The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (referred to as the “Clery Act”) is part of the Higher Education Act. It requires institutions of higher education that receive federal financial aid to report specified crime statistics on college campuses and to provide other safety and crime information to members of the campus community. 

The Higher Education Act requires colleges and universities to:

  • publish an annual report every year by October 1 that contains three years of campus crime statistics and certain campus security policy statements;
  • disclose crime statistics for the campus, public areas immediately adjacent to or running through the campus, and certain non-campus facilities and remote classrooms;
  • provide “timely warning” notices of those crimes that have occurred and “pose an ongoing threat to students and employees;”
  • describe the University’s missing student notification policy that allows students to confidentially register a contact person and missing student notification procedures;
  • disclose in a public crime log “any crime that occurred on campus. . . or within the patrol jurisdiction of the campus police or the campus security department and is reported to the campus police or security department
  • describe the University’s emergency response and evacuation procedures including how the institution will immediately notify the campus community upon the confirmation of a significant emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to safety of students or staff occurring on the campus;
  • publish an annual fire safety report that includes fire statistics and maintain a fire log

 

The Office of Safety and Security (OSS) is responsible for the preparation and dissemination of the annual security report. By October 1 of each year, all enrolled students and employees receive an email regarding the content and availability of the annual security report. The email provides information regarding how to access the report via the Internet and how to request a printed copy of the report. To request a printed copy of this report, call (206) 281-2821 or email michac@spu.edu. Prospective students and employees receive information regarding the availability and access to the report from Admissions and Human Resources, respectively.

 

Campus Access

Seattle Pacific University is private property, reserved for students, faculty, staff and their guests. They have access to academic, recreational and administrative facilities during specific hours and class schedules. This access is given only to those who adhere to the social and behavioral expectations set forth in the student and staff handbooks; it may be revoked at any time.

All special events scheduled for the campus must have prior authorization. Some campus events may require the presence of security officers. Contact the Office of Student Life for information on special event policies and procedures.

Access to residence halls is restricted to students, their guests and those staff members who have job-related business in the halls. Strict control of keys also limits access; when keys are reported lost, room locks are changed. In addition, a system of locked security doors can be opened only with student room keys or card access. Propping security or fire doors open is not allowed and failure to obey this rule may result in disciplinary action. Security officers check doors several times each day to enforce this policy and to detect malfunctions. Problems are reported immediately to the Office of Building Maintenance (206) 281-2330 for correction.

Residence hall floor areas are segregated by gender and have hours which limit visitation by the opposite sex. Overnight visits by guests of the opposite sex are not permitted and other guests must limit their stay to three days, except by permission of the hall staff. Guests are expected to follow the same behavioral standards as the residents. For visitor convenience and resident safety, residence hall lobbies are open from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. and are equipped with phones so that visitors can call students.

The campus is well-lighted but periodic reviews are made to examine use patterns, determining where improvements may be needed. Each month OSS completes an exterior lighting report to detect and report malfunctions. Also, older lighting fixtures are systematically upgraded to improve reliability and efficiency. Landscaping is reviewed as well, reducing opportunities for concealment and to avoid conflicts with lighting systems.

 

Office of Safety & Security

The Office of Safety and Security (OSS) is a private security organization which patrols campus buildings and grounds by foot and in cars 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Officers do not have deputized or state-commissioned police authority and carry no firearms, but they do make citizen's arrests when appropriate. In addition, they work closely with the Seattle Police Department in the investigation of all crimes reported on campus. Security officers are available 24 hours a day and will respond to all emergencies. They also render immediate aid, investigate incidents and complete reports for administrative follow-up. Students are also encouraged to report crimes to the Seattle Police Department. The Seattle Police and Fire Departments may be reached directly by dialing 911 from any campus phone. However, by dialing the campus emergency number, 2911 (from a cell phone call (206) 281-2911), OSS can immediately identify the building from which you are calling and security officers will then report to police or fire with accurate information. These officers can also render immediate aid in an emergency.

 

Officer qualifications include attendance at the Washington Campus Law Enforcement Training Academy, certification in first aid and CPR, as well as fire brigade and self-defense training.

 

Timely Warning Policy

It is the policy of the University to issue emergency notification alerts in an effort to notify community members about certain crimes in and around our community in a timely manner. For the purposes of this policy, "timely manner" means that upon confirmation by OSS the campus community will be immediately notified of any significant emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the health or safety of students or staff.

The Director of Safety and Security will consult, as appropriate and necessary, with other University officials regarding whether a timely warning should be issued. The decision to issue a timely warning shall be made on a case-by-case basis after consideration of the available facts, including factors such as the nature of the crime, the continuing danger or risk to the campus community, and the possible risk of compromising law enforcement efforts.  The victim’s name may be withheld from the timely warning notification in crimes that present a threat to other students and employees.

When a determination is made that a timely warning should be issued, OSS will take appropriate steps to ensure timely notification of the campus community. The University has various systems in place for communicating information quickly to the campus community. These methods of communication include the University’s mass notification system (SPU-Alert), an outdoor public address system, emergency messages that scroll across electronic reader boards, campus-wide e-mails, physical postings on doors, and announcements by Building Emergency Coordinators or the SPU website.

Anyone with information warranting a timely warning should report the circumstances to OSS at (206) 281-2911. Call extension 2911 on campus. Call 2922 for non-emergencies.

 

SPU Alert: Mass Emergency Notification System

The SPU-Alert System is a communication tool used to notify the campus community about any situation or condition that could threaten the safety of individuals on campus. In the event of an actual emergency, the SPU-Alert System allows SPU officials to send nearly simultaneous messages via cell phone text messaging, email, and telephone.

To be fully effective this system needs the cooperation of all faculty, staff and students to provide appropriate personal contact information for emergency notification. Members of the SPU community can enroll by accessing the Banner System on the web at https://www.spu.edu/banweb/ and selecting the SPU-Alert option under the Personal Menu page. The CIS Help Desk can provide technical assistance if needed.

Tests of the system will be conducted at least annually by OSS and the CIS department.

 

Emergency Contact Information

All University constituents are encouraged to add or update their Emergency Contact Information. While the SPU-Alert systems identifies how to contact the community member in the event of a campus emergency, the Emergency Contact Information identifies who should be contacted if something happens to the community member. It is accessed from the same Personal Menu page describes above; it is located above the SPU-Alert link.

In addition to registering an emergency contact, students residing in on-campus housing have the option to identify confidentially an individual to be contacted by SPU in the event the student is determined to be missing for more than 24 hours.  If a student has identified such an individual, SPU will notify that individual no later than 24 hours after the student is determined to be missing. Students who wish to identify a confidential contact can do so through the Banner Information System. See the Missing Person Policy for more information.

Additional Emergency/Medical Information

Individuals may also wish to make personal health information available for use by emergency responders in the event of a personal emergency. Supplying personal health information is voluntary for each employee. However, those individuals who have specific health issues or information they would like emergency responders to know about may take advantage of this opportunity to do so. To provide this information select the "Additional Emergency/Medical Information" link on the bottom of the Emergency Contact Information page. Access to this data will be strictly limited to Safety and Security staff to assist in responding to an emergency and will not be forwarded to any other person or department.

Federal Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act

The new Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act beginning in 2002 requires states to ask every registered sex offender if they are enrolled at or employed by a college or University. In addition, pursuant to RCW 9A.44.130, any such adult or juvenile offender who is admitted to a public or private institution of higher education shall, within ten days of enrolling or by the first business day after arriving at the institution, whichever is earlier, notify the sheriff for the county of the person's residence of the person's intent to attend the institution. Students and employees can find out information about registered sex offenders in their area through the King County Sheriff's Office website. www.metrokc.gov/sheriff/services/sex_offender_search/ 

Members of the SPU community can find out information about registered sex offenders (if any) enrolled at or employed by SPU by calling the Seattle Police Department, Sex and Kidnapping Registration Detail (SPD) at (206) 684-5332.  At this time, SPD has the most current information regarding registered sex offenders within the City of Seattle.  SPD will be able to tell you whether there are any registered sex offenders enrolled at or employed by SPU, but may decide not to provide you the identity of any Level 1 offenders unless you demonstrate a need to know, or provide a specific name to be checked.

Crime Log Information

Seattle Pacific University provides crime statistics to prospective students, matriculated students and employees. The Office of Safety and Security (OSS) makes the crime log for the most recent 60 day period open to public review during normal business hours, Monday through Friday, excepting holidays. Any portion of the log beyond 60 days, if not immediately available, will be made accessible within two business days of a request for public inspection. The University’s student newspaper, The Falcon, publishes a crime blotter on a regular basis.

Emergency Telephones

Emergency assistance call boxes are conveniently located throughout campus in well-lighted areas for requesting emergency assistance and for alerting OSS of a crime or suspicious activity. Emergency phones are installed outside the main entrances to residence halls, most elevators and most parking lots.

Safety Escort Service

The Office of Safety and Security (OSS) operates a safety escort service 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. An escort can be obtained by dialing ‘2922’ on any campus phone or at (206)281-2922 from a cell phone.

Personal Safety Education

The Office of Safety and Security offers several free courses on personal safety and crime prevention for students, staff and faculty.  Crime Prevention classes can be requested by contacting the OSS Program Coordinator at 206-281-2821.

 

The personal safety classes for women are free to students as well as faculty and staff. These programs are presented by nationally certified instructors with Rape Aggression Defense Systems. The Rape Aggression Defense System (RAD) is a program of realistic self-defense tactics and techniques for women. The RAD System is a comprehensive, women-only course that begins with awareness, prevention, risk reduction and risk avoidance, while progressing on to the basics of hands-on defense training. For more information, contact OSS at (206)281-2922.

In addition, on campus students are informed of risk reduction strategies at meetings with their peer advisors during Welcome Week.

 

Alcohol & Drugs

Seattle Pacific University is subject to the requirements of the federal Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 and the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act of 1989. The University strongly supports each act and consistently ensures compliance with them. Each year, the University distributes information to students, faculty and staff regarding the restrictions and consequences of violations of each act. Any employee or student who has not received copies of the statement should contact the University Admissions.

This information is available to others in the SPU "Drug-Free Campus" brochure. It offers details on the health risks, legal sanctions and treatment options related to alcohol and drugs. Copies of this brochure are available at the following campus locations: Office of Safety and Security; Student Counseling; Health Services; Office of Student Life; Uni-Com; Office of Admissions; and the Office of University Relations.

The University does not permit faculty, staff, or students to unlawfully possess, use, or distribute illicit drugs or alcohol or to use alcoholic beverages on its property or as part of any of its activities. Such possession, use, or sale will be grounds for disciplinary action, up to and including termination/expulsion, and referral for prosecution. An employee or student who, while on the SPU property or at any University activity, exhibits objective signs of having consumed intoxicating beverages or illicit drugs will be placed on immediate suspension. If the observed behavior is a result of drug abuse or alcohol use, the employee/student will be subject to further disciplinary action. Employees should refer to the Alcohol, Tobacco, and Drug Use Policy (in the faculty and staff handbooks) and students to the student handbook for further detail.

Any such incident will be documented and reported to the Dean of Students in the Office of Student Life (regarding students) or Human Resources (regarding employees) and to the President's Office. The disciplinary action taken will be reviewed and approved by the President or his designate.

Supervisors will immediately document any incident of substance abuse or drug/tobacco use in violation of the restrictions listed above. The documentation is to be forwarded within 72 hours to the Dean of Students in the Office of Student Life (regarding students) or Human Resources (regarding employees) and to the President's Office. The disciplinary action taken will be reviewed and approved by the President or his designate.

If an employee or student is required to complete a drug treatment and rehabilitation program as part of the disciplinary action resulting from a violation or this policy, official records of the diagnosis or treatment will be kept for three years, separate from the standard Human Resources or student records. The file will be held in the strictest confidence and will only be used as evidence to governmental and granting agencies that the University did in fact take steps toward correcting the problem.

Reporting Crimes

Prospective students, employees, and visitors to the University should know that as with any campus, there is crime both on- and off-campus and that it is important to take reasonable precautions at all times.  Students, staff and faculty are strongly encouraged to promptly report all public safety related incidents to the Office of Safety and Security (OSS).

Many SPU graduate and professional students and a number of undergraduate students live away the campus.  OSS handles investigations of crimes at all University-owned or operated facilities located within a reasonable distance from the main campus in conjunction with the Seattle Police Department. Matters occurring at properties that are more distant from the main campus may be handled entirely by the local law enforcement agency with jurisdiction.

How to Report a Crime

To report a police, fire, or medical emergency call OSS by dialing 2911 from a campus phone or (206) 281-2911 from a cell or off-campus phone. For non-emergency business calls dial 2922 from campus phones or (206) 281-2922 from cell or off-campus phones. Campus community members are encouraged to program the Security information and emergency lines into cell phones to reduce emergency response time.  Crimes that occur off campus should be reported to your local law enforcement agency. OSS will assist you in making a report to a local law enforcement agency if you wish.

University Response to Crime Reports

An OSS dispatcher is on-duty at all times to provide assistance when a report of a crime has occurred. In response to a call, security officers will take the required action, either by dispatching an officer to the caller’s location or asking the caller to report to OSS to file an incident report. Security officers will conduct a thorough investigation of all incidents and offenses. The identity of complainant(s), victim(s), and witness(es) will be kept confidential to the extent possible. Arrests, in coordination with local law enforcement agencies will be made, if warranted. All OSS incident reports are forwarded to the Associate Vice President for Risk Management as well as the Director of Residence Life for review.

Whistleblower Policy

Members of the campus community are encouraged to bring forward any concerns or allegations, regarding improper activities within the University (commonly known as "Whistleblower Complaints.") Anyone with questions or concerns regarding inappropriate or improper activities within the University, should report them to the Office of Safety and Security.

Missing Persons

Seattle Pacific University has a policy for identifying and responding to missing person situations. If a member of the University community has reason to believe that a student who resides in on-campus housing is missing, they should immediately OSS at (206) 281-2911.  Concerns that a student is missing may also be reported to the Office of Student Life or the Student Counseling Center. All departments, OSL and SCC will forward any missing student reports immediately to the Office of Safety and Security.

OSS will generate a missing person report and initiate an investigation.  The University may investigate circumstances for non-residential students who are missing out of concern for student well-being when it is determined that the University might be able to assist the student.

 

After investigating the missing person report, should OSS determine that the student is missing and has been missing for more than 24 hours, the Seattle Police Department (SPD) will be notified.  The University may notify appropriate authorities without delay when it has reason to believe the student is endangered or missing under involuntary circumstances.  The student’s emergency contact will be notified no later than 24 hours after the student is determined to be missing.  If the missing student is under 18 years of age and is not an emancipated individual, SPU will notify the student’s parent or legal guardian immediately after it has been determined that the student has been missing for more than 24 hours.

In addition to registering an emergency contact number, students residing in on-campus housing have the option to identify confidentially an individual to be contacted by the University in the event the student is determined to be missing for more than 24 hours.  If a student has identified such an individual, the University will notify that individual no later than 24 hours after the student is determined to be missing.  Students who wish to identify a confidential contact can do so through the Banner Information System on the web, www.spu.edu/banweb/. Select the Personal Menu then choose the SPU-Alert System, then select Emergency Contact Information. Choose to add a new contact or edit an existing contact. Under the “relationship” drop down menu, select “missing person contact”. Please contact the CIS Help Desk if you have questions concerning entering your personal contact information into the Banner Information System.

Other Campus Security Officials for Reporting

Different people on campus have different reporting responsibilities and different abilities to maintain confidentiality, depending on their roles at the college and upon college policy, when they receive a report of gender-based discrimination involving a student. Gender-based discrimination is an umbrella for a wide range of behaviors that falls under that descriptor, which includes sexual assault, other forms of sexual misconduct, and sexual harassment. At Seattle Pacific University, some individuals and campus resources can offer confidentiality while others have specific obligations to respond when they receive a report of a crime or a campus policy violation.

Certain campus officials also have a duty to report sexual assault and other crimes for federal statistical reporting purposes (Clery Act). All personally identifiable information is kept confidential, but statistical information must be passed along to campus law enforcement regarding the type of incident and its general location (on-or off-campus, in the surrounding area, but no addresses are given) for publication in the annual Campus Security Report. This report helps to provide the community with a clear picture of the extent and nature of campus crime, to ensure greater community safety. 

Seattle Pacific University has identified staff and faculty members who are Campus Security Authorities (CSA's). Campus Security Authorities are individuals who are involved in security or who have a significant responsibility for student and campus activities. These employees must report crimes to the Office of Safety & Security and inform an individual of the help that is available to them.

The information to be shared includes the date, the location of the incident (using Clery location categories), and the Clery crime category. This reporting protects the identity of the victim and may be done anonymously.

Campus Security Authorities

  • OSS staff
  • Human Resources staff
  • Office of Student Life staff
  • Athletic Directors and Coaches
  • Faculty Advisors
  • Study Abroad Program staff and faculty
  • Student Employee Supervisors
  • Staff in Roles of Ministry or Counseling*

* These persons are not required to disclose information unless there is a concern for imminent health and safety of the student or others.

  

Hate Crime Policy, Reporting and Resources

The Office of Safety and Security (OSS) is responsible for collecting and reporting hate motivated statistics. Anyone receiving a report of hate violence is urged to review the circumstances of the incident with OSS to ensure that an appropriate report is completed, the perpetrator is held accountable, statistics are collected and disseminated, and the victim and/or communities are provided with assistance/referrals.

Criteria for Reporting Hate Motivated Crimes and Incidents.  

Reports of hate motivated incidents are taken because there is a potential for reoccurrence and/or escalation into a criminal act. The key criterion in determining whether or not any crime or incident fits into the definition of a hate crime or incident is the motivation behind the incident. The following criteria are to be used in determining whether or not an incident is motivated by bias based on race, ethnicity, gender/perceived gender, sexual orientation, religion or disability. The list is not all-inclusive.

A criminal act may include any of the following: burning cross or religious symbol; explosives; bomb threats; assault; disorderly conduct; interrupting or disturbing religious, ethnic, cultural, political, or other meetings; unlawful use of the telephone.

A non-criminal act or incident, while not criminal, is done with the apparent intention to harass, intimidate, threaten, retaliate, create conflict, because of any person's race, religion, ethnic background, etc.

 

Confidential Reporting

Victims of crime that do not want to pursue action within the University system or the criminal justice system may still want to consider making a confidential report. The Office of Safety and Security (OSS) can file a report on the details of the incident without revealing the victim’s identity. The purpose of a confidential report is to comply with the victims wish to keep the matter confidential, while taking steps to ensure the future safety of themselves and others. With such information, the University can keep an accurate record of the number of incidents involving students, employees, and visitors; determine where there is a pattern of crime with regard to a particular location, method, or assailant; and alert the campus community to potential danger. Reports filed in this manner are only counted and disclosed in the annual crime statistics for the institution.

Crime Statistics

College and University campus crime statistics are an important resource that the entire campus community and prospective members of it can use to gauge their safety, and take proactive steps to avoid and prevent campus crime.

In accordance with the Campus Security Act, the University provides crime statistics to prospective students, matriculated students and employees. Crime statistics are available for reported crimes that occur on-campus, off-campus, non-campus and public property and are published on the OSS website. The statistics represent alleged criminal offenses reported to campus security authorities and/or local police agencies. Therefore, the data collected do not necessarily reflect prosecutions or convictions for crime. Because some statistics are provided by non-police authorities, the data are not directly comparable to data from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting System which only collects statistics from police authorities.

 

See Appendix A for Crime Statistics.

Sexual Assault

Although Seattle Pacific University makes every reasonable effort to provide for the safety and security of its students, sexual assault is a reality on any college campus. In a study of "date rape" on 32 college campuses, one in four women surveyed were victims of rape or attempted rape. What's more, eighty-four percent of those raped knew their attacker. And rape is not just a crime against women. There are cases of sexual assault against men as well.

Therefore, it is to your advantage to know as much as you can about the issue of rape and how to cope with it should it happen to you, or someone you know. You should also be aware of the University policy toward sexual assault and become familiar with the laws of Washington State. If you or someone you know is the victim of a sexual assault, resources are available to help you on and off campus.

The University offers several prevention and awareness programs for both students and employees.  New students and employees are required to attend a primary prevention program that address:

  • The definitions of rape, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking
  • The definition of consent, with reference to sexual offenses
  • Descriptions of safe and positive options for bystander intervention an individual may take to prevent harm or intervene in risky situations
  • A description of the signs of abusive behavior and how to avoid potential attacks
  • The availability of free personal safety classes for women and non-gender specific crime prevention classes.
  • Reporting of gender-based violence types of crimes
  • Investigation and grievance process
  • Campus resources
The month of April is the National Sexual Assault Awareness Month and SPU participates with an annual campaign.

Definitions of Gender-based Violence Crimes

Discrimination is defined as unequal, adverse treatment of an individual because of his or her protected legal status, such as race, age, or gender. For instance, different treatment of two similar individuals with respect to pay, opportunity for advancement, or educational opportunity constitutes discrimination if the reason for the different treatment is the protected status of one of the individuals.

Harassment is defined as unwelcome, hostile, or inappropriate conduct directed toward an individual because of his or her protected status (for instance, persistent comments or jokes about an individual’s religion, race, age, or gender). Such conduct violates university policy if it has the purpose or effect of creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work environment, living environment, or studying environment for the individual or substantially interferes with that individual’s employment, living or educational environment.

Retaliation is defined as adverse or negative action against an individual who has (1) complained about alleged discrimination, harassment or retaliation, (2) participated as a party or witness in an investigation relating to such allegations, or (3) participated as a party or witness in a court proceeding or administrative investigation relating to such allegations.

 

Sexual Harassment is one type of harassment. It includes any unwelcome sexual advance, request for sexual favor, or conduct of a sexual nature when:

  • Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of employment or obtaining an education; or
  • Submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as a factor in affecting that individual’s employment or education; or
  • Such conduct has the purpose or effect of substantially interfering with an individual’s employment or education, or of creating an intimidating, demoralizing, threatening or hostile employment, living, or educational environment.

Sexual assault or non-consensual sexual contact is frequently misunderstood across campuses nationally. Sexual assault occurs when a sexual act is intentional and (a) is committed by physical force, threat or intimidation; (b) ignores the objections of another person; or (c) takes advantage of another person’s incapacitation, state of intimidation, helplessness, or other inability to consent.

Rape as defined by the Washington State Criminal Code means engaging in sexual intercourse (which includes several forms of intimate contact) with another person by forcible compulsion; or when the victim is incapable of consent by reason of being physically helpless or mentally incapacitated (such as when the victim is intoxicated and/or unconscious); or when a victim does not consent to sexual intercourse with the perpetrator and such lack of consent is clearly expressed by the victim's words or conduct. In some cases, a rape may occur in a social setting (for instance, on a date or at a party), and the victim does not understand that the incident meets the legal definition of rape. The perpetrator may also be unaware that the incident meets this definition.

Sexual exploitation occurs when a student takes non-consensual or abusive sexual advantage of another for his/her own advantage or benefit, or to the benefit or advantage of anyone other than the one being exploited, and the behavior does not otherwise constitute one of the other sexual misconduct offenses.

Examples of sexual exploitation include, but are not limited to:

  • Invasion of sexual privacy;
  • Prostituting another student;
  • Non-consensual viewing, videoing or audio-taping of sexual activity;
  • Knowingly transmitting an STI or HIV to another student;
  • Exposing one’s genitals in non-consensual circumstances; inducing another to expose their genitals;
  • Sexually based stalking and/or bullying may also be forms of sexual exploitation.

Domestic violence (as defined by the Violence against Women Act) is the use of physical, sexual or emotional abuse or threats to control another person who is a current or former spouse or other intimate partner, such as a boyfriend or girlfriend. It includes felony or misdemeanor crimes of violence committed by a current or former spouse of the victim, by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common, by a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse, by a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction receiving grant monies, or by any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction.

  • Examples of domestic violence include but are not limited to:
  • Causing or attempting to cause physical or mental harm to a family or household member
  • Placing a family or household member in fear of physical or mental harm
  • Causing or attempting to cause a family or household member to engage in involuntary sexual activity by force, threat of force, or duress
  • Engaging in activity toward a family or household member that would cause a reasonable person to feel terrorized, frightened, intimidated, threatened, harassed, or molested

Dating violence (as defined by the Reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994) is violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim; and where the existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on a consideration of (1) the length of the relationship, (2) the type of the relationship, and (3) the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship Dating violence is a pattern of assaultive and controlling behaviors that one person uses against another in order to gain or maintain power and control in the relationship. The abuser intentionally behaves in ways that cause fear, degradation and humiliation to control the other person. Forms of abuse can be physical, verbal, sexual, emotional and psychological.

Examples include, but are not limited to, trying to cut off the victim’s relationship with family and friends, humiliating the victim in front of friends, making the victim fearful by using threatening behavior, threatening to find someone else if the dating partner doesn’t comply with the abuser’s wishes or demands, using or threatening to use physically assaultive behaviors such as hitting, shoving, grabbing, slapping, beating, kicking, and touching or forcing the victim to engage in unwanted sexual activity.

Stalking (as defined by the Reauthorization of the Violence against Women Act of 1994) is a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to: (1) feel fear for their safety; or (2) the safety of others or suffer substantial emotional distress. Acts of stalking include but are not limited to: telephone harassment, being followed, receiving unwanted gifts, and other similar forms of intrusive behavior.

Consent is clear, knowing and voluntary. Consent is active, not passive. Silence, in and of itself, cannot be interpreted as consent. Consent can be given by words or actions, as long as those words or actions create mutually understandable clear permission regarding willingness to engage in (and the conditions of) sexual activity.

Consent to any one form of sexual activity cannot automatically imply consent to any other forms of sexual activity. Previous relationships or prior consent cannot imply consent to future sexual acts. Consent can be withdrawn. Thus, even if a person agreed to sexual interaction or continued sexual interaction, that person has the right to change her or his mind, irrespective of how much sexual interaction may have already taken place. In order to give effective consent, one must be of legal age.

Force is the use of physical violence and/or imposing on someone physically to gain sexual access. Force also includes threats, intimidation (implied threats) and coercion that overcome resistance or produce consent (“Have sex with me or I’ll hit you.” “Okay, don’t hit me; I’ll do what you want”).

Coercion is pressure for sexual activity. Coercive behavior differs from seductive behavior based on the type of pressure someone uses to get consent from another. When someone makes clear to you that they do not want sex, that they want to stop, or that they do not want to go past a certain point of sexual interaction, continued pressure beyond that point can be coercive.

Incapacitation is a state where someone cannot make reasonable decisions because they lack the capacity to give knowing consent (e.g., to understand the “who, what, when, where, why or how” of their sexual interaction). Consumption of alcohol or drugs alone is insufficient to establish incapacitation. The question of incapacitation is determined on a case-by-case basis. It will include an analysis of whether the responding party knew, or should have known, that the complaining party was incapacitated, or if the responding party played a role in creating the circumstance of incapacity.

University Position on Gender Based Violence

In addition to the legal consequences of sexual assault, the University has its own policies against sexual violence of any kind, from harassment to rape (see the Student Handbook, pages 34, 42-43). The University prohibits all gender-based acts of violence including rape, domestic violence, sexual assault, harassment, and stalking. Infractions of these policies can result in a variety of disciplinary actions, up to and including suspension or permanent expulsion from the University.

The University will make reasonable accommodations to meet the needs of an assault victim's academic and living situation after an alleged sex offense. This may mean offering to change the victim's class schedule and/or the location of the victim's residence.  

If the accuser or the accused wish to have a friend present during the University's investigative proceedings, approval must be arranged in advance. Attorneys are not permitted to be present. Both parties will receive the same opportunities to have others present during the University's disciplinary proceedings. Upon written request, SPU will disclose to the alleged victim of a crime of violence, or a non-forcible sex offense, the results of any disciplinary hearing conducted by the college against the student who is the alleged perpetrator of the crime or offense. If the alleged victim is deceased as a result of the crime or offense, SPU will provide the results of the disciplinary hearing to the victim’s next of kin, if so requested.

What to do if you are sexually assaulted

If you are sexually assaulted, resources are available on and off campus to help you. It is important to preserve evidence in case you decide to press charges. If you are raped or sexually assaulted on campus:

  • Get to a safe place as soon as you can.
  • Try to preserve all physical evidence. Do not wash, use the toilet or change clothing if you can avoid it. If you do change clothes, put all clothing you were wearing at the time of the attack in a paper bag (no plastic bags).
  • You have the option to notify law enforcement. Call either the Office of Safety or Security at (206) 281-2911 and/or the local police department, 911. Making a report with OSS is a separate step from making a police report and choosing to prosecute. You have the right to make a report with the Seattle Police Department (SPD). When you file a report with the police department, you are not obligated to continue with legal proceedings, and can choose whether or not you would like to do so at any point. If the decision is made to make a report with SPD, the Office of Safety and Security will help you through the police reporting process, if you choose to make one.
  • Get medical attention as soon as possible to make sure you are physically well and to collect important evidence in the event you may later wish to take legal action. You can receive an exam at the Harborview Center for Sexual Assault & Traumatic Stress: 206.744.1600. More information can be found at http://depts.washington.edu/hcsats/services.html. The Washington State Crime Victims Compensation Program (CVCP) will pay for the initial sexual assault exam by a Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE).  A sexual assault exam provides medical care and evidence collection for victims of sexual assault, in a safe and private environment, 24 hours a day. Nurses are trained to collect evidence, administer medication for the prevention of STDs and pregnancy and provide information and referrals. If an individual thinks that he or she has been drugged, the nurse will provide toxicology testing. All evidence can be stored for up to one year. Getting a medical exam does not trigger a law enforcement or university report of sexual assault.
  • Health Services is available to SPU students and employees Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-12 noon & 1-4:30 p.m. Appointments can be made by calling (206) 281-2231. Health Services can assist with most medical concerns, including pregnancy and STD testing following an assault. Health Services does not collect evidence in cases of sexual assault. Going to Health Services does not trigger a report of sexual assault.
  • You can also contact SPU's Student Counseling Center at (206) 281-2016.
  • Another resource is the Rape Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN) at 1-800-656-HOPE.  The Rape, Abuse, Incest National Network will automatically transfer the caller to the nearest rape crisis center, anywhere in the nation.

 

Emergency Response

SPU’s Emergency and Crisis Management Plan is updated annually and can be found on the SPU web page at www.spu.edu/info/emergency/index.asp.  Links to the plan are also located on the "Current & New Students" and "Faculty & Staff" tabs on the SPU main page.

The University works closely with the Seattle Police Department and the Seattle Fire Department to coordinate multi-agency responses to emergencies on the SPU campus.  Both SPD and SFD will notify OSS of any event, such as a threat of violence or hazardous material spill that occur near the University and may impact the campus community.

 

Online Emergency Preparedness Tutorial

An online tutorial designed to provide faculty and staff with a general understanding of SPU’s Emergency and Crisis Management Plan is available. This orientation to SPU’s emergency policies and procedures will help familiarize individuals with the University’s planned response to a crisis. Students may view the tutorial upon request: contact OSS at (206) 281-2922.

 

"Stop. Think. Act." Books

The “Stop. Think. Act. Seattle Pacific University Emergency Procedures" booklet is distributed to all employees and located in all classrooms and gathering spaces around campus. The booklet contains a list of evacuation sites for each building as well as steps to be taken in response to specific types of emergencies. A flipbook has been attached to the podium or located in another conspicuous place in each classroom. In addition, booklets are secured in most gathering spaces on campus such as lounges, residence hall lobbies and campus dining facilities. RLCs and PAs in each residence hall have copies of the flipbook as well.

 

Building Emergency Coordinator (BEC)

One or more Building Emergency Coordinators have been appointed for each campus building. In the residence halls, the RLCs serve as BECs. These individuals are vital in the efforts to respond successfully to an emergency situation and to determine whether everyone in a given building is accounted for. BECs are asked to provide leadership and guidance to the community during an emergency. They will assist OSS with notification to their building occupants of the type of emergency and provide instructions on how to respond. During and evacuation, they will account for community members at designated buildings evacuation locations.

Emergency Drills

Emergency drills will be conducted on an annual basis to help evaluate the effectiveness of the University’s emergency plan and to train people on the appropriate emergency response procedures. The buildings affected and the times of the drills will vary from drill to drill so that the occupants of all campus buildings will have the opportunity to practice for an actual campus emergency. Drills may be announced or unannounced. All drills will be documented, including a description of the exercise, the date, time, and whether it was announced or unannounced.

Campus Lockdown and Evacuation Information

In the event of a violent incident on campus there would likely be a campus wide lockdown. The SPU-Alert System will be used to notify the campus community that a lockdown is in effect. In a lockdown, campus building entrances will be locked and all persons inside should find a secure location to take shelter in. Most offices and classrooms doors can be locked by pushing a button or other mechanical device on the door lock should an emergency situation arise which would warrant such action.

In the event an act of violence occurs on campus it can be assumed that, unless specific notice is given otherwise, all remaining classes and events for the day have been cancelled. The purpose of this default policy is to avoid confusion due to lack of information so that any person who is off campus when violence occurs and hears a notice of such an event can assume that they should not come to campus. A communication will go out via a number of avenues (email, snow closure hot-line, web page, Seattle media, etc.) to the community if classes or events will resume as originally scheduled.

Lockdown / Shelter in Place – General Guidance

In the event that the University is threatened by an act of violence such as a bank robbery or armed intruder on campus, the University will initiate a lockdown. It should be assumed, unless specific notice is given otherwise, all remaining classes and events are temporarily suspended until the incident is over. Lockdown notifications are sent from the SPU-Alert System to cell phones as text messages and to email, announced by Building Emergency Coordinators and displayed on electronic reader boards.

If in a building at the time of the lockdown individuals should:

  • Stay in the buildings unless it is affected or the danger is in the immediate area.  If it is affected, evacuate;
  • Move to a securable area (such as an office or classroom) and lock the doors;
  • Close the window coverings then move away from the windows and get low on the floor;
  • Remain in the secure area until further direction or the all clear is given (this notification will be sent via the SPU-Alert System)

If locked out of a building, individuals should:

  • Leave the area  and seek safe shelter off campus
  • Return to campus after the all clear is given (this notification will be sent via the SPU-Alert System)

Evacuation – General Guidance

An evacuation will be considered if a campus building is affected. The campus will always evacuate if the fire alarm sounds.  In the event of an evacuation, individuals should gather personal belongings (purse, keys, cell phone, SPU-ID card, etc.) and proceed to the nearest exit. Most classrooms contain a wall plaque or poster on or next to the classroom door showing the evacuation route and the assembly site for the building. The elevator should not be used. 

Once individuals have evacuated a building, they should proceed to the nearest evacuation location (the booklet “Stop. Think. Act” attached to each classroom podium contains a list of evacuation sites for each building). Community members will be instructed to check-in with a Building Emergency Coordinator (BECs are easily recognizable by their bright orange vests). During emergencies, please give the BEC your full cooperation whenever they issue directions or information.

Campus Fire Safety Information

In accordance with the 2008 changes to the Higher Education Opportunity Act, institutions that maintain on-campus housing, shall, on an annual basis, publish a fire safety report.  For compliance purposes this report is contained in this section of the annual Safety on Campus Clery Compliance report.  In accordance with the law the complete report’s name has been changed to Clery Compliance and Fire Safety Reporting.

Reporting a fire is everyone’s responsibility.  All fires that present a risk to persons or property both on and off campus should be reported immediately to OSS and/or 911. Additionally, concerns about fire that are not considered an emergency may be reported to a Residence Life Coordinator, supervisor, designated Building Emergency Coordinator, Facilities Management, or OSS.

See Appendix B for Fire Safety Systems in on-campus student housing.

See Appendix C for dates fire drills were conducted for the previous three years.

 

Fire Safety for On Campus Apartments

Inspections for fire safety equipment and a mandatory state inspection of the hot water heaters are done as state law and University policy requires.

A fire extinguisher is located in every apartment; learn where it is located. Never relocate the fire extinguisher. If the extinguisher is used to extinguish a fire, immediately notify OSS it will be replaced at no cost. The University inspects fire extinguishers once a year, but tenants should periodically inspect the gauge to be certain the fire extinguisher is properly charged. If the needle indicates that it is undercharged or overcharged notify OSS. Barbecue grills and combustible materials such as propane, gasoline, kerosene, and items containing combustible materials (i.e. lanterns) are not permitted inside the apartment (including storage closets/units).

Because of the risk of burning incense or an open flame left unattended, the use of such is prohibited in residence halls. Candles or lanterns may not be used even in the event of a power outage. Residents are encouraged to have flashlights or similar devices to provide emergency lighting.

In accordance with state law, smoking is prohibited in University buildings. This includes balconies and stairwells to residence hall rooms or public areas.

Smoke Alarms/Detectors

Smoke alarms are located on the ceiling/wall in every apartment; learn where they are located. When the alarm is set off, it will make a loud piercing sound. If the alarm beeps intermittently, the batteries need to be replaced. Please notify OSS as soon as possible. Tampering with smoke detectors may result in disciplinary action, including a fine and/or eviction. Excessive amounts of smoke from cooking or excessive amounts of steam from the bathroom may activate the smoke alarm. If this occurs, simply ventilate the apartment by opening the doors and windows and turning on the fan. The detector will automatically stop sounding when the smoke or steam is completely removed from the area.

 

Fire Alarms & Evacuation Procedures

Legitimate fire alarms save lives. When activated, the alarm sounds in the entire building and everyone must evacuate immediately. Residence halls have emergency procedure signs that indicate the designated evacuation areas for the building. Students should report to a designated evacuation area and check in with a PA or RLC in charge of that location.

Fire Drills

Safety and Security works with residence hall staff to conduct fire drills for each residence hall annually. Students are instructed on evacuation procedures during this process.

Fire Statistics

Seattle Pacific University publishes as part of the Annual Security and Fire Safety Report, statistics for the three most recent complete calendar years pertaining to on-campus student housing only.  Those statistics include: location, total number of fires in each building, date, time, cause of the fire, number of injuries requiring treatment at a medical facility, number of deaths related to a fire, value of the property damage caused by the fire and a unique case number.

See Appendix D for Fire Statistics

Fire Log

Seattle Pacific University maintains a fire log that records any fire that occurs in an on-campus student housing facility.  The fire log includes the date the fire was reported, time, and nature of the fire and general location of each fire.  Entries are made within two business days of the receipt of information.  The fire log for the most recent sixty day period is open to public inspection during normal business hours (8:00 AM to 5:00 PM, Monday through Friday) at OSS.  Any portion of the log older than sixty days is available within two business days of a request for inspection.

See Appendix D for Fire Log Details

 

Appendix A. Crime Statistics

 

Criminal Offenses - On Campus

 

2010

 

2011

 

2012

a. Murder/Non-negligent manslaughter

0

0

0

b. Negligent manslaughter

0

0

0

c. Sex offenses - Forcible

1

0

0

d. Sex offenses - Non-forcible (incest and statutory rape only)

0

0

0

e. Robbery

1

0

0

f.  Aggravated assault

0

0

0

g. Burglary

14

11

10

h. Motor vehicle theft

1

1

1

i.  Arson

1

0

0

Criminal Offenses - On-Campus Residence Halls

 

2010

 

2011

 

2012

(Residence Halls are a subset of On Campus)

 

 

 

a. Murder/Non-negligent manslaughter

0

0

0

b. Negligent manslaughter

0

0

0

c. Sex offenses - Forcible

1

0

0

d. Sex offenses - Non-forcible(incest and statutory rape only)

0

0

0

e. Robbery

1

0

0

f.  Aggravated assault

0

0

0

g. Burglary

6

10

5

h. Motor vehicle theft

0

0

0

i.  Arson

0

0

0

Criminal Offenses – Noncampus

 

2010

 

2011

 

2012

a. Murder/Non-negligent manslaughter

0

0

0

b. Negligent manslaughter

0

0

0

c. Sex offenses - Forcible

0

0

0

d. Sex offenses - Non-forcible (incest and statutory rape only)

0

0

0

e. Robbery

0

0

0

f.  Aggravated assault

0

0

0

g. Burglary

0

0

0

h. Motor vehicle theft

0

0

0

i.  Arson

0

0

0

Criminal Offenses - Public Property

 

2010

 

2011

 

2012

a. Murder/Non-negligent manslaughter

0

0

0

b. Negligent manslaughter

0

0

0

c. Sex offenses - Forcible

0

0

0

d. Sex offenses - Non-forcible (incest and statutory rape only)

0

0

0

e. Robbery

0

0

1

f.  Aggravated assault

0

0

0

g. Burglary

0

0

2

h. Motor vehicle theft

0

0

1

i.  Arson

0

0

0

 

Hate Offenses - On Campus

 

2010

 

2011

 

2012

a. Murder/Non-negligent manslaughter

0

0

0

b. Negligent manslaughter

0

0

0

c. Sex offenses - Forcible

0

0

0

d. Sex offenses - Non-forcible(incest and statutory rape only)

0

0

0

e. Robbery

0

0

0

f.  Aggravated assault

0

0

0

g. Burglary

0

0

0

h. Motor vehicle theft

0

0

0

i.  Arson

0

0

0

j. Simple Assault

0

0

0

k. Larceny-theft

0

0

0

l. Intimidation

0

0

0

m. Destruction/damage/vandalism of property

0

0

0

j.  Any other crime involving bodily injury

0

0

0

Hate Offenses - On-Campus Residence Halls

 

2010

 

2011

 

2012

(Residence Halls are a subset of On Campus)

 

 

 

a. Murder/Non-negligent manslaughter

0

0

0

b. Negligent manslaughter

0

0

0

c. Sex offenses - Forcible

 0

 0

 0

d. Sex offenses - Non-forcible(incest and statutory rape only)

0

0

0

e. Robbery

0

0

0

f.  Aggravated assault

0

0

0

g. Burglary

0

0

0

h. Motor vehicle theft

0

0

0

i.  Arson

0

0

0

j. Simple Assault

0

0

0

k. Larceny-theft

0

0

0

l. Intimidation

0

0

0

m. Destruction/damage/vandalism of property

0

0

0

j.  Any other crime involving bodily injury

0

0

0

Hate Offenses – Noncampus

 

2010

 

2011

 

2012

a. Murder/Non-negligent manslaughter

0

0

0

b. Negligent manslaughter

0

0

0

c. Sex offenses - Forcible

0

0

0

d. Sex offenses - Non-forcible(incest and statutory rape only)

0

0

0

e. Robbery

0

0

0

f.  Aggravated assault

0

0

0

g. Burglary

0

0

0

h. Motor vehicle theft

0

0

0

i.  Arson

0

0

0

j. Simple Assault

0

0

0

k. Larceny-theft

0

0

0

l. Intimidation

0

0

0

m. Destruction/damage/vandalism of property

0

0

0

j.  Any other crime involving bodily injury

0

0

0


 

Hate Offenses - Public Property

 

2010

 

2011

 

2012

a. Murder/Non-negligent manslaughter

0

0

0

b. Negligent manslaughter

0

0

0

c. Sex offenses - Forcible

0

0

0

d. Sex offenses - Non-forcible(incest and statutory rape only)

0

0

0

e. Robbery

0

0

0

f.  Aggravated assault

0

0

0

g. Burglary

0

0

0

h. Motor vehicle theft

0

0

0

i.  Arson

0

0

0

j. Simple Assault

0

0

0

k. Larceny-theft

0

0

0

l. Intimidation

0

0

0

m. Destruction/damage/vandalism of property

0

0

0

j.  Any other crime involving bodily injury

0

0

0

Arrests - On-Campus*

 

2010

 

2011

 

2012

       * Stats indicate number of persons involved

 

a. Illegal weapons possession

0

0

0

b. Drug law violations

0

0

0

c. Liquor law violations

0

0

0

Arrests - On-Campus Residence Halls

 

2010

 

2011

 

2012

(Residence Halls are a subset of On Campus)

 

a. Illegal weapons possession

0

0

0

b. Drug law violations

0

0

0

c. Liquor law violations

0

0

0

Arrests - Noncampus

 

2010

 

2011

 

2012

a. Illegal weapons possession

0

0

0

b. Drug law violations

0

0

0

c. Liquor law violations

0

0

0

Arrests - Public Property

 

2010

 

2011

 

2012

a. Illegal weapons possession

0

0

0

b. Drug law violations

0

0

0

c. Liquor law violations

0

0

0

 

Disciplinary Actions/Judicial Referrals - On-Campus

 

2010

 

2011

 

2012

a. Illegal weapons possession

0

0

0

b. Drug law violations

*7

*11

*27

c. Liquor law violations

*62

*37

*48

Disciplinary Actions/Judicial Referrals – Student Housing Facilities

 

2009

 

2010

 

2012

a. Illegal weapons possession

0

0

0

b. Drug law violations

*7

*11

*27

c. Liquor law violations

*62

*37

*48

Disciplinary Actions/Judicial Referrals – Non-campus

 

2009

 

2010

 

2012

a. Illegal weapons possession

0

0

0

b. Drug law violations

0

0

0

c. Liquor law violations

0

5

*8

 

 

 

Disciplinary Actions/Judicial Referrals - Public Property

 

2009

 

2010

 

2012

 

 

 

 

a. Illegal weapons possession

0

0

0

b. Drug law violations

0

0

0

c. Liquor law violations

0

0

0

 


 

Appendix B. Resident Hall Fire Safety Systems

ASR Campus Student Housing Facility

Fire Alarm Monitored On site by OSS

Partial* Sprinkler System

Full** Sprinkler System

Smoke Detection

Heat Detection

Fire Extinguish Devices

Evacuation Plans & Placards

Number of evacuation (fire) drills each calendar year

Ashton Hall (611 W. Dravus St.)

X

X

 

X

X

X

X

3

Andrews Apartments (37 W. Dravus St.)

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

0

Bailey Apartments   (3041-55 Third Ave W.)

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

0

Cremona Apartments   (34 W. Cremona St.)

X

 

 

X

X

X

 

0

Davis Apartments   (3019 Third Ave. W).

X

X

 

X

X

X

 

0

Emerson Hall   (500 W. Emerson St.)

X

 

X

X

X

X

X

3

Falcon Apartments (600 W. Emerson St.)

X

 

 

X

X

X

 

0

Falcon Duplex   (3463 Sixth Ave. W.)

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

0

Falcon Fourplex      (3469-75 Sixth Ave. W.)

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

0

Falcon Twin Apartments    (608 W. Emerson St.)

X

 

 

X

X

X

 

0

Hill Hall    (3231 Sixth Ave. W.)

X

X

 

X

X

X

X

3

Moyer Hall ( 3234 Fifth Ave. W.)

X

 

 

X

X

X

X

3

Robbins Apartments    (2701 Third Ave. W.)

X

 

 

X

X

X

X

NA

Sprague Apartments    (35 W. Cremona St.)

X

 

 

X

X

X

 

0

Wembley Apartments    49 W. Dravus St.

X

 

X

X

X

X

X

0

Cremona Wesley Apartments   (13 W. Cremona St.)

X

 

X

X

X

X

X

3

Dravus Wesley Apartments    (20 W. Dravus St.)

X

 

 

X

X

X

X

3

650 W. Bertona St.

X

 

 

X

X

X

 

0

703 W. Bertona St.

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

0

14 W. Cremona St.

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

0

18 W. Cremona St.

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

0

40 W. Cremona St.

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

0

42 W. Cremona St.

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

0

303 W. Dravus St.

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

0

314 W. Dravus St.

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

0

320 W. Dravus St.

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

0

323 W. Dravus St.

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

0

403 W. Dravus St.

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

0

415 W. Dravus St.

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

0

516 W. Dravus St.

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

0

605 W. Emerson St.

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

0

617 W. Emerson St.

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

0

339 W. Nickerson St.

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

0

2807 3rd Ave. W.

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

0

3206 4th Ave. W.

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

0

3201-03 5th Ave. W.

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

0

3205 5th Ave. W.

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

0

*Partial Sprinkler System is defined as having sprinklers in "common areas" only

**Full Sprinkler System is defined as having sprinklers in both common areas and individual rooms

 

 

Appendix C. Historical Fire Drill Dates for Residence Halls


Fire Drill Dates

 

 

 

 Resident Halls

2010

2011

Ashton Hall

10/05/2010

10/03/2011

Emerson Hall

10/04/2010

10/04/2011

Hill Hall

10/04/2010

10/03/2011

Moyer Hall

10/04/2010

10/03/2011

Campus Houses & Apts.*

10/05/2010

10/04/2011

*Robbins Apartments

In 2012 the University began conducting quarterly fire drills during the academic year.

Date of Drill

Time of Drill

Location

Announced / Unannounced

October 1, 2012

8:30pm

Emerson Hall

Unannounced

October 1, 2012

9:10pm

Wesley Apartments**

Unannounced

September 24, 2012

9:10pm

Hill Hall

Unannounced

September 24, 2012

9:10pm

Moyer Hall

Unannounced

September 24, 2012

8:30pm

Ashton Hall

Unannounced

April 9, 2012

9:10pm

Hill Hall

Unannounced

April 9, 2012

9:10pm

Moyer Hall

Unannounced

April 9, 2012

8:00pm

Ashton Hall

Unannounced

April 2, 2012

8:30pm

Emerson Hall

Unannounced

April 2, 2012

9:10pm

Robbins Apartments*

Unannounced

January 10, 2012

9:00pm

Emerson Hall

Unannounced

January 10, 2012

8:00pm

Robbins Apartments*

Unannounced

January 9, 2012

9:00pm

Hill Hall

Unannounced

January 9, 2012

9:00pm

Moyer Hall

Unannounced

January 9, 2012

8:00pm

Ashton Hall

Unannounced

 

*Robbins Apartments was sold and is no longer SPU property.

**Wesley Apartments were added to SPU’s inventory and began to be included in residential fire drills
in 2012

 

Appendix D. Fire Statistics

2010

2011

2012

Name of Facility

Fires

Injuries

Deaths

Fires

Injuries

Deaths

Fires

Injuries

Deaths

Ashton Hall

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

0

0

Andrews Apt.s

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Bailey Apt.s

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Cremona Apt.s

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Davis Apt.s

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Emerson Apt.s

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Falcon Apt.s

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Falcon Duplex

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Falcon Fourplex

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Falcon Twin Apt.s

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Hill Hall

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

Moyer Hall

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Robbins Apt.s

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Sprague Apt.s

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Wembley Apt.s

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Cremona Wesley Apt.s

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Dravus Wesley Apt.s

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

314 W. Dravus St.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

320 W. Dravus St.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

703 w. Bertona St.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

303 W. Dravus St.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

415 W. Dravus St.

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

403 W. Dravus St.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

339 W. Nickerson St

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

3206 4th Ave. W.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

3201-03 5th Ave. W.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

323 W. Dravus St.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2807 Third Ave. W.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

3205 5th Ave. W.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

14 W. Cremona St

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

18 W. Cremona St.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

516 W. Dravus St.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

40 W. Cremona St.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

42 W. Cremona St.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

0

0

0

3

0

0

1

0

0

 

*Fire-related Incident Details

Incident Number

Date/Time Reported

Campus Facility

Date/Time of Fire

On-Campus

Cause of Fire

Prop. Damage

Injury(s)

Death(s)

110410B

4/10/2011 12:41

Hill Hall 3231 Sixth Ave. W.

4/10/2011 approx 12:39

Yes

Unintentional -Stove fire

0

0

0

111213A

12/13/2011 17:55

415 Dravus

12/13/2011 approx. 17:55

Yes

Unintentional -Stove fire

0

0

0

111215A

12/15/2011 14:28

Ashton Hall 611 West Dravus St.

12/15/2011 approx. 14:25

Yes

Unintentional - Light fixture

$100

0

0

120512A

5/12/2012 2:13

Ashton Hall 611 West Dravus St.

05/12/2012 approx. 02:10

Yes

Unintentional - Stove fire

$15,196

0

0

*There were no on-campus housing fires in 2010

 

 

 
   

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